CN/TW: discussion of domestic violence, Nigella Lawson/Charles Saatchi.

Sophie Neville

As an architecture gallery, Anise Gallery’s show puts buildings at the centre of its response to the ‘Nasty Women’ movement of art and activism, focusing, among other things, on the domestic as an architectural space. Many of the works displayed contemplate violence and the domestic. Theresa Bradbury’s Untitled is a photograph of a naked young woman, smiling coyly at the camera, wallpaper patterns cut into her paper flesh. Wallpaper surfaces again in Rachel Ara’s Cameo series, based on photographs of Nigella Lawson being strangled by Saatchi. Women’s bodies and the home, as pretty and comforting as they may seem, are places of violence.

Theresa Bradbury Untitled

A radical embroidery piece by Sophie Neville in this show reads ‘A WOMAN’S PLACE IS IN THE RIOT’ in cross stitch on an embroidery ring. There’s also an installation of translucent cylinders, based on the shape of an embroidery ring, enclosing Martha Rosler’s seminal video piece Semiotics of the Kitchen, 1975. The supposed primness of embroidery and the notion of the woman’s place being in the home is powerfully disrupted by the sound of Rosler demonstrating the use of various kitchen tools, cutting, grating and sawing.  On the way to this show I listened to a podcast on the politics of textiles in art, and recently I’ve been enjoying Hannah Hill’s radical embroidery on Instagram. I now want to know everything about the politics of needlework (all book suggestions appreciated). Neville’s piece at Anise Gallery is feminine and powerful, it made me laugh and filled me with energy.

Rachel Ara Cameo series

For me the most powerful work was Rachel Ara’s Doom III (The Death of Ana Mendieta). I’ve discussed Ana Mendieta’s story before, pushed to her death from her 34th-floor apartment by her husband, and this work digitally reconstructs her murder scene. Ara depicts the space where Mendieta’s body would have lain as a dip in the ground, a nod a burial plot as well as to Mendieta’s work, used against her as proof that her death was suicide. It’s also an empty space and an empty scene, reflecting the silence that too regularly meets instances of violence against women, especially women of colour.

Section of Rachel Ara’s Doom III (The Death of Ana Mendieta) pls excuse the rubbish quality, couldn’t get rid of the reflection.

This show is open until 18th November 2017 and art sale proceeds (I think it’s 10%) goes to Rape Crisis South London.

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