Archives for posts with tag: video

Anthony McCall’s light sculptures make me want to play. Digitally projected lines in a dark, smoke-filled room make intangible walls of smoky white light. Once my eyes were used to the darkness I spent some time walking through these misty barriers and playing with shadows against a soundscape of trickling water and muted traffic sounds. The water sound feels close, and the traffic far away. I pictured the water like a little brook nearby. It was very relaxing. In one room a man was standing quietly, looking at the light work. I wanted to play around in it but felt like I would be disturbing him. I felt like he was missing out by not walking through the work. The Hepworth’s website talks about the viewers becoming ‘active participants’ which I usually read as art-world speak for ‘go and get stuck in’.

Two video works are also on display. Landscape for Fire, 1972, has a ritualistic, mystical air to it. Three or four people dressed in white walk around a grassy field, setting alight little circular tins set up in a grid. The orange of the flames stand out against the dark grass, the grey sky, and the white clothes made blue by the dawn light. The wind whistles and the matches flare. It was planned but not rehearsed, which is perhaps why it feels organic and very real. Crossing the Elbe, 2015, is different. It’s set in an industrial landscape, all shipyards and high rise buildings. McCall installed three 5-mile searchlights on top of buildings in Hamburg to point in different directions across the city. The video is short shots of the lights bisecting the sky in different parts of the city, with the noise of the city in the background. I was expecting this to feel more hurried, like how a city feels more stressful than a field, but it was as relaxing as Landscape for Fire. Maybe even more so – Landscape for Fire has a sense of urgency to it, like something is compelling those people to light those fires, like they have to do it before daybreak. There is less action, more stillness in Crossing the Elbe. Combined, these two works refuse the dichotomy of urban/busy and natural/peaceful.

McCall’s technical preparatory drawings show the calm logic underpinning the light sculptures. I appreciate artists who can translate cold, hard science into something tangible and emotional. It’s a delight to insert yourself physically into McCall’s light sculptures that look like three dimensional graphs. McCall’s use of light as a medium left me uplifted and lighthearted.

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17 works by women photographers lent by the National Museum of Women in the Arts reflect the diverse, complex, and often shared experience of women worldwide.

Lying on a bed in a green dress, staring at the viewer with twirled hair styled and placed in a halo around her head, Daniela Rossell’s ‘Medusa’ is a better, more substantial precursor to Kendall Jenner’s most liked instagram pic. There is power here, and vulnerability and intimacy which, shockingly, is not present on Kendall’s gram.
Hellen van Meene’s photographs are like illustrations for a book of fairy tales. The text described them as looking natural but actually planned meticulously. To me they do look painstakingly curated and posed. To me there is nothing natural about the props and scenarios. Each subject seems to have an unclear but definite story – one girl is a bubblegum princess in a tower, another girl dead from a curse, a third girl blows magic dust to cast her spell. In this exhibition on the female body and the female gaze the fairytale element is unsurprising – fairytale women have very definite roles set out for them. Here there is some discussion of how real girls and women feel – bubblegum princess is bored, and the girl clutching the feather heart looks more angry and sad than happily in love.

Nan Goldin’s ‘Self-Portrait in Kimono with Brian, NYC’ has a melancholy intimacy about it. Partially clad on a bed in a rosy dawn or dusk light, this could be a romantic, post-coital scene, but the back to back figures seem to hold something from one another. Their tension and frustration is in contrast to Brian’s upfront sexuality that can be glimpsed in the photograph of him, cigarette dangling from lips, pinned in the top right corner of the work. This is an honest snapshot of a moment in relationship, and an almost universal experience.

It’s always a pleasant relief to see images of women through the eyes of women. Interestingly, there were no nudes in this exhibition – these were women’s and girls’ bodies without the sexualised male gaze. That’s not to say the women depicted were devoid of sexuality, rather that these women are more than simply sexual. There was an intimacy present in many of these photographs; the viewer is often invited into a bedroom, again not so much a sexual as a private place. But there were also grand scenes, such as Marina Abramovic as a peace warrior on a white stallion. Women can be everything, and there was a little bit of everything in these photographs.